Announcing Open Source of .NET Core Framework, .NET Core Distribution for Linux/OSX, and Free Visual Studio Community Edition

Announcing Open Source of .NET Core Framework, .NET Core Distribution for Linux/OSX, and Free Visual Studio Community Edition

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Over the last several years we have integrated more and more open source technology into our .NET, Visual Studio, and Azure offerings.  We have also begun to open source more of our own code and technology as well.

Earlier this year, at the Build 2014 conference, I announced the creation of the .NET Foundation – which is an independent organization designed to foster the development and collaboration of open source technologies for .NET.  We have now open sourced ASP.NET, EF, Web API, NuGet and the "Roslyn" C# and VB compilers under it. 

It has been great to see the energy and innovation in these technologies since we made the open source announcements. We continue to have dedicated Microsoft teams working on each of them (several of the teams have more developers than ever before).  The open source process is now enabling the teams to collaborate even more with other developers in the community, and every single one of the above projects have now accepted code contributions from developers outside Microsoft.  The combination is enabling an even richer flow of ideas, and even better products.

Open Sourcing the .NET Core Runtime and Libraries

Today I’m excited to announce that we are going even further, and will be open sourcing the .NET Core Runtime.  This will include everything needed to execute .NET code – including the CLR, Just-In-Time Compiler (JIT), Garbage Collector (GC), and core .NET base class libraries.

We are releasing the source under the MIT open source license and are also issuing an explicit patent promise to clarify users patent rights to .NET.  This morning, we published the public repository on GitHub where the project will be hosted: https://github.com/dotnet/corefx

Today’s source release includes many of the newer core .NET framework libraries (ImmutableCollections, SIMD, XML and MetadataReader).  These libraries are fully open, and are ready to accept contributions.  Over the next several weeks and months we will continue to transfer source (including the Core CLR which is not there right now but in the process of being moved) into the repository and likewise make it open for contributions.

What does this open sourcing mean?

Today’s open source announcement means that developers will have a fully supported, fully open source, fully cross platform .NET stack for creating server and cloud applications – including everything from the C#/VB compilers, to the CLR runtime, to the core .NET base class libraries, to the higher-level .NET Web, Data and API frameworks.

It is an exciting day for .NET, and the new open source process will allow the .NET teams in Microsoft to collaborate even more deeply with other developers around the world.  The result is going to be even better products for everyone.

Tagged under: ASP.NET,Microsoft,Open Source